Lisa complained to us about the sale of her personal accident policy. She says she was led to believe she’d taken out a life insurance policy. 

What happened

Lisa complained to us about the sale of her personal accident policy. She says she was led to believe she’d taken out a life insurance policy. The business said the literature was clear enough for her to know she’d bought a personal accident policy. When Lisa complained, the insurer wouldn’t uphold her complaint, so she came to us.

How we helped

We looked at the evidence from the time of the insurance sale. This showed that the policy was sold in one of the business’s branches. The business provided an original copy of the sales checklist they used, called a Personal Accident Plan. The checklist showed that the business didn’t give any advice about the suitability of the policy. However, the key facts had been explained to Lisa and she’d been given a copy of the policy document and signed the checklist.

Because Lisa had signed the checklist, we felt it was likely that the steps set out in the checklist took place – like Lisa being given copies of the relevant documents. We also reviewed the documents which explained how the policy worked. There wasn’t any evidence to suggest she’d taken out a life insurance policy.

Our decision

We told Lisa we didn’t feel the policy had been mis-sold, so we didn’t have any basis to ask the business to refund her premiums.